I have been inspired to write a rap for you:

I can barely see past, the reed canary grass

The river is just ahead, if only the Pharlaris would drop dead

Third week out here, I’ve spotted a few deer

Learning about weed whacking, even some elk tracking

Mud in my boots, pulling out invasive roots

I am sent out here to kill; tomorrow I will need an advil

Lewis and Clark made their mark, here at this park.

Now its my turn to impress, WAIT HOLD UP, sorry to transgress

This rap is about weeds, so I shall proceed about stopping seeds

This is the optimal time, for pulling baby vines

Holly, laurel, and blackberry, do not belong in the prairie

Nor in the temperate rainforest, that I am exploring

Now its easy to get mixed up, not talking about a buttercup

Rubus laciniatus, urinus, and discolor, now to tell them apart from each other

Himalayan blackberry (R. discolor) has a robust stem with heavy prickles

Bear with me and my riddles

Cutleaf (R. laciniatus) have five serrate, lobed leaflets

Both of these sweet berries pose serious threats

We have to protect our native plants, preserve the forests,

the wetlands and even the hornets.

Invasive species control is important,

I hope rapping made this info absorbent.

If not, just remember…

NPS is the best, forget all the rest!

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Written by Kayla Fermin
I am a recent graduate of Syracuse University, where I studied Geography and Religion. I am now working as a biological technician intern in the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park in Astoria, Oregon. Follow my adventures!